On Revolution, Uprising and Resistance: Lebanon - Iraq - Syria

“Tomorrow the revolution will rise up again,clashing its weapons,
and to your horror it will proclaim with trumpets blazing: I was, I am, I shall be!”

– Rosa Luxemburg –
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In Lebanon and Iraq, people have taken to the streets in mass protests since October 1st, 2019. While these movements share important structural similarities, they remind us of the uprisings of 2011/2012 that swept across many countries in the MENA-region. In Syria, this protest movement has developed into a full-blown civil war that has been raging on ever since.

Media coverage of the conflict has mainly been focusing on the narratives that violence and war dictate, and as a result, waves of social mobilization and crucial revolutionary moments have been overlooked. This year’s uprising in Lebanon and Iraq has gained only limited coverage by English and German Media. We, therefore, dedicated a special section on our website to gather information and shed light on past and present protest movements in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq. This includes Chronicles of the Uprisings in Lebanon and Iraq, Visual MemoriesTestimonials and Articles.

Memories

"... It’s early December 2012, one year after I left my home and my city Damascus in Syria. More than a year had gone by while I had been waiting in exile. The once peaceful revolution had turned violent, being drawn into armed clashes by the regime. The number of casualties and detainees were rising, as violence took over. I was watching everything from outside of my country’s borders – a cursed country- helplessly. I decided to go to northern Syria, to the region around Idlib and Aleppo, where the Free Syrian Army had expelled all regime forces and had taken control. I was hoping to once again find my role in this revolution, just like before it had turned violent. But unlike the beginning of the revolution, we weren’t united, our demands and slogans not in unison as before, and I found myself unable to carry on for long. The peace that we were seeking had long been buried under rubble next to the bodies of our martyrs. Our dignity, that we were proud of was quickly replaced by the humiliation of hunger and siege. During my time in northern Syria, I met and filmed many rebels, documenting what was happening around us, or maybe to keep it for memories because what is happening is obvious and does not need more documenting, and because most of whom I filmed were killed."
Mohamad Blakah Videographer

Defection statement - Idleb Countryside
December 2012

Videographer: Mohamad Blakah

Frontline - Aleppo
December 2012

Videographer: Mohamad Blakah

Testimonials

Beirut, October 29th, 2019: 18-years old Roula is experiencing protests for the first time. The university student from Beirut is happy to see protests sweeping across the country, because she "never thought that

Marj Bisri, November 2nd, 2019.Jean works in an electronics store in Jounieh Together with other activists, he spent two nights in a tent in the Bisri Valley, demonstrating against a new mostly World-bank financed

Sour, November 8th, 2019: Mohammad, 22 years old, has been skipping his classes at University since the beginning of the revolution. Instead he’s going to the protests in Sour in the South of

Articles

Lebanon witnessed its last big protest movement in 2015. Where do you see continuities and differences between the previous and current movements?

There are many people who are trying to delegitimize the

The announcement of new taxes sparked unprecedented protests in Lebanon. For weeks, protesters have taken to the streets across the country to demand the resignation of its leaders

At the heart of

“Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose”—the more things change, the more they stay the same. This saying is a good way to describe current developments in Lebanon. Many structural problems in the country have remained unchanged for years,